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Showing posts with label Celeste Evans. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Celeste Evans. Show all posts

06 August 2017

Celeste Evans in the news

From the Globe and Mail, CTV News, and the Toronto Star, by Sandra Szklarski:
Canadian magician Celeste Evans, a headstrong entertainer whose trailblazing career took her around the world during an era that largely discouraged such female independence, has died.

The B.C.-born illusionist was largely self-taught and loved to perform, despite facing huge hurdles in an industry dominated by men, said her daughter Evanna Brening from her home in North Carolina.

Ms. Brening said her mother died of old age on July 25 in Charlotte, N.C. She was 85.

“She was completely something different,” said the 47-year-old Ms. Brening, who joined her mother onstage once she learned to juggle at the age of 7.

“When we would go to the conventions, we would tell the young kids: ‘Find your niche, don’t be somebody else, find out who you are and create a character around that.’ And that’s what my mother did, she created a character around what God gave her.”

Read more.


From iTricks in 2013:
One of the most successful women magicians in history, Celeste spent the 1960s touring around the world literally performing for royalty. Now retired, she was good enough to talk to iTricks in this two part interview.

In many ways, 1957 was the break out year for Celeste Evans. In February, Hugard’s Magic Monthly carried two important mentions of her. First, her recent appearance on the television show Circus Time was discussed. It was not her first TV show, nor would it be her last, and the recap speaks positively of her finale with silks and birds. More importantly, though, is the coverage of the SAM Parent Assembly show on the 15th, which she opened. “Celeste Evans opened the show with her sexy sorcery” the report starts, describing her as an “attractive, personable brunette” who showed “solid skill.” Again, the highlight of her performance was her finale. “She whipped off her skirt for a flashy finish in a tight-fitting costume with stockings and long gloves standing out via black light. Silk juggling and colored dove productions brought her a solid hand.

Read more.


Via iTricks, on YouTube, an interview from approximately 10 years ago:






Via iTricks, on YouTube, Celeste on "To Tell the Truth":



26 July 2017

Broken wand: Celeste Evans

To learn more about Celeste's extraordinary life and contribution to magic, have a look at "Even in Magic, Happiness First" over at the Northeast Journal, or visit her site at CelesteEvansMagic.com.

The family has suggested that donations in Celeste Evans name could be sent to:
The Junior Program
‪c/o The Magic Castle,‬
 ‪7001 Franklin Avenue‬,
L.A. ‪CA 90028‬.


From the Celeste Evans Facebook page:

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From Shawn Farquhar's Facebook page:





Also from Shawn's Facebook page:

















05 January 2014

Celeste Evans: Queen of Magic

Part 1 from iTricks:
Celeste Evans is a living legend in the world of magic. She describes herself as “a museum relic.”

One of the most successful women magicians in history, Celeste spent the 1960s touring around the world literally performing for royalty. Now retired, she was good enough to talk to iTricks in this two part interview.

Read more and watch video of Celeste on To Tell the Truth.

Part 2 from iTricks:
Last week iTricks spoke to her about breaking through the boys’ club of magic and finding success in New York and on television. This week she talks about her international stardom and even offers some advice to today’s magicians.

Born in a small town in British Columbia just north of the Washington State border, Celeste Evans was initially drawn to magic partially because she was told it was something girls simply could not do. Dedicating herself to practice, she studied magic on her own for years. As a young woman, she moved to Vancouver for a job and was finally able to acquire sleight of hand lessons from local magic store owner Jon Kirby, although the local magic club was for men only. Shows around town led to an Asian tour of Canadian military bases, more touring and eventually her first television show. By 1957, Celeste Evans was not only doing nationally televised American shows such as To Tell The Truth, she was featured in an important SAM show and even landed on the cover of Genii.

Read more.