Showing posts with label Ariel Fralich. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ariel Fralich. Show all posts

26 October 2014

24 January 2014

Review: Reading Writing

From Wayne Kawamoto:
Reading Writing teaches an entire system of analyzing handwriting. It will take some memorization and you’ll have to sharpen your skills at recognizing the subtle differences, but there are single sleight of hand moves that take far longer to master.

What’s great about this book is that it offers a gateway into the possibilities of combining handwriting analysis with mentalism and magic. The book explains mentalism “experiments”  regarding: determining favorites, lie detection, a prediction, a book test, matching writing to a person and more. There are also angles on classics such as ambitious card.

I have studied books on the topic and I wish that Ariel Frailich’s “Reading Writing” had been around earlier. This is the book that I would have wanted as a start. I recommend this one and I’ll sign to it.

Read more.

10 November 2013

The Society of Canadian Magicians

Back in the Spring of 2011, I posted about a Facebook page David Donoghue had set up for remembering the Society of Canadian Magicians (SCM).  However, that page no longer appears functional.

Does anyone know what happened to it?

Ariel Frailich recently posted about the convention.  It would be nice if the memories could all be collected in one place.

17 July 2013

Ariel Frailich on Full Circle Magic

From Full Circle Magic's May 6th Q&A with Ariel Frailich, owner of I Saw That Exclusive Magic:
Magic is theatre, not circus. With proper attention to presentation, we can invoke any emotion we want, we can show who we are, we can become real people instead of cardboard cut-outs. Then we become unique, uncopyable, and with any luck, in demand. It’s the difference between people saying, “I saw Ariel perform”, rather than, “I saw a guy do card tricks”.

Read more.

03 May 2013

Ariel Frailich and Reading Writing

For those of you who won't be able to attend the Reading Writing book signing party at The Browser's Den on Sunday, I understand that Full Circle Magic is doing a Q&A with Ariel on Facebook, Monday May 6 at 5PM EST.

I've managed to get a sneak peak at the book and it looks fabulous!  I can't wait until I get a chance to dig into the fantastic material!

08 April 2013

Toronto: "Reading Writing" book launch

From The Browser's Den:
Book-Signing Event by Author, Ariel Frailich!

READING WRITING, Handwriting Analysis for Magicians & Mentalists’ Book

Sunday, May 5 from 1:00pm to 3:30pm at Browser’s Den of Magic

SPECIAL PRICE FOR BOOK ($45 instead of $55), COFFEE, SNACKS

BONUS: FREE TICK SHEET TEMPLATE FOR THOSE WHO BUY THE BOOK OR PICK UP THEIR BOOK ON THIS DAY.

Dear Magicians & Mentalists,

You are invited to attend the book launch party at the date and time above.

Mr. Ariel Frailich author of past best-selling magic books has finally finished his latest work after almost 4 years of work.  It is one of the most unique books for magicians, mentalists and hobbyists I have ever seen. READING WRITING is hardcover and 196 pages in length and loaded with illustrations.

Read more.

29 December 2012

John McLachlan's new e-book

From the Ring 17 newsletter:
Lybrary.com has recently released a new eBook filled with stand up (no table) coin material from Toronto performers. The 112 page PDF includes twenty-five routines and sleights dealing exclusively with coins. Written by JohnMcLachlan, it includes contributions from:  

Read more.

25 July 2011

Links for 25-July-2011

06 July 2011

[Guest post] Magic: The Next Generation

A few days ago, Ariel Frailich was describing his experience lecturing at the Browser's Den magic club along with James Fulford, James Alan and Mahdi Gilbert.  I found his take on the day intriguing and cornered Ariel into agreeing to write it up as a guest post.  True gentleman that he is, he graciously agreed.
 
The following is a guest post* by Ariel Frailich: writer, publisher, creator of magic and owner of  I Saw That! Exclusive Magic.

--
 
Toronto’s wonderful magic shop, the Browser’s Den of Magic, has its own magic club that meets once a month. The club is aimed at young magicians and beginners, but everybody is welcome, of course. Jeff Pinsky, the owner of the shop, regularly invites members of the magic community to perform at the club as special guests.

When Jeff invited me to perform at the July 2nd meeting, I was at a bit of a loss as to what to show. In my experience, young people who start out in the contemporary ‘flash and flourish’ school of magic consider our older, ‘hide-your-skill’ style passé. This is hardly surprising, as their idols put forth the idea that a magic performance is a display of dexterity. Hence, every gesture must be flashy, every action must be a flourish.

I asked myself: what could I show that wouldn’t be greeted by stifled yawns and polite applause?

A few days later, the answer came to me in a flash (of inspiration, not manipulation). I would show them some “old-school” esoterica! In the ‘70s, we used the term ‘esoteric’ for techniques that were particularly angly or finnicky to perform. The term has fallen into disuse. (The wags might argue that it’s because angly and finnicky techniques have become the norm today, so there’s no reason to give them a separate category. But I’m not a wag.)

I decided to demonstrate and teach the techniques I used in my first ambitious card routine (which later evolved into DIY Ambitious Card, published in Card Stories). A double lift from the centre, Tabled Tilt, ‘Rise, rise, rise!’ and a tabled colour change. I wanted to show that “old school” techniques could be just as bold, clever and visual as “new school” moves. I also wanted to show something they could use; for all that they’re on the esoteric side, the techniques I chose are actually quite practical and not terribly angly. But most importantly, I wanted to show that hiding one’s skill creates a much more magical effect than displaying dexterity.

It was a success. I caught their interest and fooled them. I got oohs and ahhhs, laughter, applause -- and even a minor avalanche of questions, for they were eager to learn. I showed them that “old school” magic may not be as passé as they had thought. I taught them a few techniques that they can use. And I showed them that magic without obvious displays of skill can look very magical indeed.

Then I moved in for the kill.

I performed my 'Andrus Misunderstood' colour change, which replaces the tabled colour change in the published version of the trick. It’s the most magical-looking thing I do, and approaches my ideal of looking like the magic happens without the performer doing anything.

Eyes popped. Jaws dropped. Stunned silence. The young man to whom I had taught the move a few weeks earlier literally begged me not to explain it. The others continued to stare in disbelief.

The first time I did this move for an audience of contemporary of young magicians, one young man told me: “This is the first time I’ve ever seen ‘real’ magic. Now I’m going to have to re-think everything I do.”

What an eye-opener! From this and a few similar experiences, it became very clear to me that “new school” magicians simply never experienced good magic without flash and fury, or at least, not enough of it to make them see that there is a better way.

This is why I always make a point of showing young magicians this move. On its own, it’s rarely enough to cause as dramatic a shift as in the case of the young man mentioned above. But it is a step in the right direction and an opportunity to broach the subject for further discussion.

To my fellow “old shoolers,” I would like to say: “It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness. Instead of bemoaning the ‘new school’ approach, let us show young magicians what good magic is supposed to look like and foster discussion.” And to the “new schoolers,” I would like to say: “Hey, you of the Butterfly Cut Brigade -- don’t dismiss the grey beards quite yet; they just might give you a run for your money!”



Thank you Ariel for guest posting at Canada's Magic! 

To read more of Ariel's thoughts on magic, read his book "Card Stories," visit the Articles section of I Saw That! or follow his companion blog, I Wrote That!

--
* This post is copyright © Ariel Frailich and is published with permission.  Please contact Ariel directly to work out terms and conditions for republishing.

01 July 2011

Links for 1-July-2011

30 June 2011

Ariel Frailich: I Saw That!

Ariel Frailich has relaunched his website I Saw That! Exclusive Magic which in addition to the old content now includes a companion blog titled "I wrote that!".  Ariel sells books authored by himself (and others such as Mark Lewis) as well as selling his own tricks. Keep up with IST! on Facebook and Twitter.  Or go the site and subscribe by RSS or e-mail.

Be sure to tell him that Canada's Magic sent you!

07 March 2011

Book launch: "The Lives of a Showman"

Last Friday I had the pleasure of attending a book launch party for “The Lives of a Showman” by Mark Lewis. (I live tweeted the event with the tag #TLOAS though I missed tagging a few tweets here and there.)

Upon entering Browser’s Den of Magic, I was instructed to direct my attention upward. Hanging from the ceiling were more than a dozen cheerful Lee Asher sign creations containing “Markisms” such as “If they were all the nine of hearts it would look like this” and “You're quite slow, do you work for the post office?” The mood was set!

It was clear that Mark has a tremendous amount of support in the local magic community! I found myself shoulder-to-shoulder with Jeff Pinsky, Jeff Hinchliffe, Ariel Fralich, Mia Ngueyn and Adam Harmes who had all made contributions to, or were mentioned in, the book. Other notables present include*: Gordon Precious, Owen Anderson, Paul Pacific, Chris Westfall, John Pellatt, Richard Lyn, John Michalson, Shawna Ross-York, Dan McLean, Steve Shrott, Joe Schwarcz and young Daniel (one of Mark’s students).

While reading from his book, we were regaled with stories of Mark’s experiences with The Worst Audience Ever at The Blue Angel and his early days of (not so) psychic readings in Ireland with Adam Harmes. Mark also read a piece written about him by Mai Nguyen, winner of the Jerry Gladman Memorial Scholarship in Journalism.

To round out the evening we were treated to James Alan’s rendition of Mark’s “Pig Trick” and then we all laughed ourselves silly through Jeff Hinchliffe’s impersonation of Mark doing his Svengali deck hustle.

It is always a delightful experience to hear an author read his own words. If the rest of the book is even half as entertaining as the launch party, it should be a good read indeed!

To purchase “The Lives of a Showman” visit Mark's website, Browser’s Den of Magic or contact your local magic dealer.


--
* If I’ve missed listing anyone who was there please send me an e-mail or leave a comment below! Thank you to John Pellatt, Ariel Fralich and James Alan for providing attendee intel on the parts of the room I didn’t make it to.